Most popular food in New Zealand, Australia, Malaysia and Singapore

If you were to identify the most popular food, just one food in each country, what would that dish be?

The list would be endless as there are so many yummy edibles.  There is definitely more than just one single type of food for each country but this blog shows only one dish out of the many.

People eat different kind of food for breakfast, lunch or dinner so the below are more on lighter meals more for brunch, snacks or finger food (for New Zealand & Australia), not the usual formal dinner food.

New Zealand
The population in New Zealand (especially Auckland) is so diverse so we have all sorts of food from Filipino, Chinese, Thai, Korean, Japanese, Malaysian, Singapore, Vietnam, Turkish, Mediterranean, Middle East, Dutch, French, European, Kiwi cuisines and lots more.

In New Zealand, we eat anything from

  • Roast Lamb. Succulent and tender, roast lamb is a Kiwi favourite. …
  • Māori hāngī The hāngī was the most widely used method of cooking by Māori for more than 2000 years. …
  • Fish and Chips on the beach
  • New Zealand sweets, candies
  • New Zealand Desserts
  • Cheese and Wine
  • Chinese (Thai) Takeaways
  • Pizzas, Pies & Quiches

As the list goes one, I will pick what we have in abundance, our “Fush & Chups” on the beach.  They used to be wrapped in old newspaper years ago but now some restaurants printed their wrapping paper making it look like newspaper to keep the traditional look.

Fish-Chip1

Australia
Our neighbour’s cuisine is so like ours.  They boast they have the best pies but we sing the same tune too.  For this post, we will give Australia the honour to share their pies as their popular food.

Australian cuisine (similar to New Zealand) is heavily influenced by British colonization, with many popular foods in the country coming directly from English or Irish cuisine traditions. Other food traditions in Australia include roast dinners, fish and chips, and blood pudding. Iconic foods unique to Australia include Vegemite, Tim Tams, fairy bread and the fried Australian hamburger.

Australia like New Zealand has abundance of sea food and I love their barramundi fish and blue mussels where the flesh is not as big or rubbery (chewy) as our local NZ mussels.

meatpie

Malaysia & Singapore
Eating out is a past time for Malaysians and Singaporeans.  With numerous hawker styled food courts, it is generally cheaper and more convenient to eat out after 8 to 10 hours of work, Mondays to Fridays.  While official work hours are either from 8am to 4pm (or 9am to 5pm), often workers do not leave their office till 6pm.  When one is flat out at work, isn’t eating out the most rewarding thing to do? Enough slaving at work so time for others to ‘slave’ or cook for you.

Most Malaysian Singaporean dishes are rice or noodles based.  One unique trait Singaporeans and Malaysians share is that they insist on having chilli with anything they eat.  Any noodle dish is not complete without chilli padi (bird’s eye chili) in soya sauce and laksa (spicy noodle soup) isn’t laksa if it does not come with a side of sambal (hot sauce made from chili and spices).

It’s hard to name just one popular dish in Malaysia with its 13 states in all.  Since I was born in Kuching, Sarawak, I will pick kolo mee for Malaysia and growing up in Singapore, I would say Chicken Rice is one of their many popular dishes.

While New Zealanders and Australian greet each other with
“What’s up, mate?” or “How are you?”

Malaysians and Singaporeans often ask
“Chiak Pah Boi?” “Have you eaten?” especially the older folks though the trend now is moving towards “Lu Ho Bo?” meaning “How are you?”.

Indeed there are so many things to talk about with this simple four letter word  FOOD, so much so that we entertain clients with food and drinks to build the connection (Guangxi) and break the ice for a mutual win-win situation in businesses as well as bonding with family and friends.

From the desk of a foodie ……………………………..