From Every Angle – Silo Park, Auckland

The name says it all, Silo Park, situated between Jellicoe and Beaumont Streets has been established around the 35 metre Golden Bay cement silo and ‘Silo 6’ in recognition of the area’s industrial heritage. Throughout the summer, Night markets take place every Friday evening in Silo Park. The Silos come to life in the form of outdoor cinema.

Silo Park needs more than three angles to show its beauty.  I have only captured a part of the Park.

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From Every AngleThis week, photograph a stationary subject from three different angles.

Source: From Every Angle

Ephemeral, capture it before it disappears

shadows

Something that is fleeting or short-lived is ephemeral, like a shadow with no lasting effect.

The ephemeral joys of childhood or life in general is short-lived, it’s only transitory, never permanent.

Therefore capture the good moments, live life to the full.

Live everyday on a fresh new start, new beginnings.

Show us what ephemeral means to you.
via Ephemeral.

Depth

Image

A field full of lavenders.  Deeply beautiful.

A field full of lavenders. Deeply beautiful.

Sailing in the deep blue sea.

Sailing in the deep blue sea.


This week, share with us your take on “depth” — you can take it literally, like me, by showing something (a dense forest, your lawn after a blizzard) that suggests volume, a distance between surface and bottom. Or go with a more figurative approach: use a deep color palette, play with your image’s depth of field, or highlight a person, a place, or an object to which you feel deeply connected.

via Depth.

Favorites On Our Bookshelf: Free Ebooks From the Daily Post

This is handy (below link from Daily Post) and will now be my bookmark for some writing inspiration.

A simple tip for easy reference is to have a ‘reblog’ folder in your blog.  Or a ‘reference’ folder or any name you wish to create that you could visit and have a little read for some inspiration.

Quite often, an idea or a topic on what to blog about came to me while driving on the road.

Where does your blog idea or topic comes from?

 

bookmark

Looking for some daily writing inspiration? Need some fundamentals to improve your photography? How about ideas on how to grow your audience?

via Favorites On Our Bookshelf: Free Ebooks From the Daily Post.

A picture is worth a thousand words

A picture is worth a thousand words.

There’s a difference between photography and visual storytelling. You can easily take a photograph, but not all photographs tell rich stories.

via Visual Storytelling: Tips from Photographer Laura Cook.

Time to showcase my photographs and see how well I fit in to Photographer Laura Cook’s tips.

Exploring the 10 tips of Visual Storytelling from Photographer Laura Cook.

1.   Find a subject you are passionate about.

Seagulls on the beach.

Seagulls on the beach.  I love taking photos of seagulls but none as cool as this one with seagull caught in action.  Love this photo – credits facebook.

2.  Use the light around you.

Day light highlighting the blue skies and sea.

Natural daylight highlighting the shades of blue – the sky , the sea, the swimming pool.

3.  Keep it simple.

Sometimes the best stories are the simple ones.  Obviously these are refreshing summer drinks.

Sometimes the best stories are the simple ones. Obviously these are refreshing summer drinks.

4.  Paint a scene with a photograph.

Simply taking photograph of a person is often not good enough to tell a story.  Include your subject's environment to add not only perspective, but meaning.  This photo show a street cleaner in Guangzhou.

Simply taking photograph of a person is often not good enough to tell a story. Include your subject’s environment to add not only perspective, but meaning. This photo shows a street cleaner in Guangzhou.

5.  Look out for details.

Find the physical angle that best suits the telling of that story.  The google tells it all.

Find the physical angle that best suits the telling of that story. Drinks awaiting for swimmers.  The goggle tells it all.

6.  Find your niche.

Zoom in on something specific and see where that takes you.  Notice the colors these girls are wearing.  Notice the stage and the open field.  What does this picture tell you?

Zoom in on something specific and see where that takes you. Notice the colors these girls are wearing. Notice the people, the stage and the open field. What does this picture tell you?

7.  Find your niche – but also leave your comfort zone.

Identify a type of photography you’d like to try — or view as difficult or something you’d never do — and then get out there and give it a go.  This is a quick and swift shot.

Identify a type of photography you’d like to try — or view as difficult or something you’d never do — and then get out there and give it a go. This is a quick and swift shot.

8.  Frame your stories.

I thought the 'frame' would make the photo more interesting.

Consider backgrounds and select locations that will add interesting visual lines, shapes, and frames within your images. I thought the ‘frame’ would make the shot more interesting.

 

 

9.  Break the rules.

Never be afraid to try different things. Shoot the same scene from many angles, look for unusual perspectives.  This is a raw shot of a chapel with rays of sunlight and reflection.

Never be afraid to try different things. Shoot the same scene from many angles, look for unusual perspectives. This is a raw shot of a chapel (at Mulia Nusa Dua) with rays of sunlight and reflection.

10.  Find the best POV for your story.

Think about what you want to say — and who or what you want to highlight — which will help you decide what physical POV (point of view) is best.

Think about what you want to say — and who or what you want to highlight — which will help you decide what physical POV (point of view) is best.  Street peddlers in Vietnam.

 

Related article

Visual Storytelling: Tips from Photographer Laura Cook

 

 

 

Travel Photography – Tip Seven : Follow the light

Experiment with shadows and use them to “paint” a person’s portrait : the shadow from the lace in a curtain. the grid of a screen, the leaves of a tree, and so on.  Don’t be afraid to experiment with light.

– quote Photography our Travels : Tips from Infinite Satori –

window view

tour buses
airasia

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Photographer, world wanderer, and Infinite Satori blogger Stephanie Dandan shares tips and inspirational advice for capturing moments during your travels.

Travel Photography – Tip Six : Don’t be afraid to get lost

Travel Photography – Tip Three : Explore a variety of landscapes

 

When you connect to a moment, it will come alive in your photograph.

 

TIP THREE :  EXPLORE A VARIETY OF LANDSCAPES

Tam Coc means three grottoes where tourists take rowing boat (sampans) to explore the untouched beauty of  the famous "Halong Bay in the ricefields", Vietnam. The boat trips last 2-3 hours and take visitors on the serene Ngo Dong river through the sugarloaf hills and along the rice fields.

Tam Coc means three grottoes where tourists take rowing boat (sampans) to explore the untouched beauty of the famous “Halong Bay in the ricefields”, Vietnam. The boat trips take visitors on the serene Ngo Dong river through the sugarloaf hills and along the rice fields.

Tourists pay to take photos with this water buffalo.

Tourists pay to take photos with this water buffalo.

Visit Hoa Lu Ancient Capital - the old citadel and explore 2 temples which built on the ground of the old royal palace, one is dedicated to King Dinh Tien Hoang, the other is to King Le Dai Hanh.

Visit Hoa Lu Ancient Capital – the old citadel and explore 2 temples which built on the ground of the old royal palace, one is dedicated to King Dinh Tien Hoang, the other is to King Le Dai Hanh.

Related Articles

Photographer, world wanderer, and Infinite Satori blogger Stephanie Dandan shares tips and inspirational advice for capturing moments during your travels.

Travel Photography : Tip Two – Observe everything around you