A picture is worth a thousand words

A picture is worth a thousand words.

There’s a difference between photography and visual storytelling. You can easily take a photograph, but not all photographs tell rich stories.

via Visual Storytelling: Tips from Photographer Laura Cook.

Time to showcase my photographs and see how well I fit in to Photographer Laura Cook’s tips.

Exploring the 10 tips of Visual Storytelling from Photographer Laura Cook.

1.   Find a subject you are passionate about.

Seagulls on the beach.

Seagulls on the beach.  I love taking photos of seagulls but none as cool as this one with seagull caught in action.  Love this photo – credits facebook.

2.  Use the light around you.

Day light highlighting the blue skies and sea.

Natural daylight highlighting the shades of blue – the sky , the sea, the swimming pool.

3.  Keep it simple.

Sometimes the best stories are the simple ones.  Obviously these are refreshing summer drinks.

Sometimes the best stories are the simple ones. Obviously these are refreshing summer drinks.

4.  Paint a scene with a photograph.

Simply taking photograph of a person is often not good enough to tell a story.  Include your subject's environment to add not only perspective, but meaning.  This photo show a street cleaner in Guangzhou.

Simply taking photograph of a person is often not good enough to tell a story. Include your subject’s environment to add not only perspective, but meaning. This photo shows a street cleaner in Guangzhou.

5.  Look out for details.

Find the physical angle that best suits the telling of that story.  The google tells it all.

Find the physical angle that best suits the telling of that story. Drinks awaiting for swimmers.  The goggle tells it all.

6.  Find your niche.

Zoom in on something specific and see where that takes you.  Notice the colors these girls are wearing.  Notice the stage and the open field.  What does this picture tell you?

Zoom in on something specific and see where that takes you. Notice the colors these girls are wearing. Notice the people, the stage and the open field. What does this picture tell you?

7.  Find your niche – but also leave your comfort zone.

Identify a type of photography you’d like to try — or view as difficult or something you’d never do — and then get out there and give it a go.  This is a quick and swift shot.

Identify a type of photography you’d like to try — or view as difficult or something you’d never do — and then get out there and give it a go. This is a quick and swift shot.

8.  Frame your stories.

I thought the 'frame' would make the photo more interesting.

Consider backgrounds and select locations that will add interesting visual lines, shapes, and frames within your images. I thought the ‘frame’ would make the shot more interesting.

 

 

9.  Break the rules.

Never be afraid to try different things. Shoot the same scene from many angles, look for unusual perspectives.  This is a raw shot of a chapel with rays of sunlight and reflection.

Never be afraid to try different things. Shoot the same scene from many angles, look for unusual perspectives. This is a raw shot of a chapel (at Mulia Nusa Dua) with rays of sunlight and reflection.

10.  Find the best POV for your story.

Think about what you want to say — and who or what you want to highlight — which will help you decide what physical POV (point of view) is best.

Think about what you want to say — and who or what you want to highlight — which will help you decide what physical POV (point of view) is best.  Street peddlers in Vietnam.

 

Related article

Visual Storytelling: Tips from Photographer Laura Cook

 

 

 

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